Join Me In Veracruz’s Tropical Melting Pot

January 21-28, 2017

Here in Veracruz you will be engulfed with sensations…the sounds, sights and tastes of this port of call of Spanish conquistadors, and their African slaves, along with those already a part of this first Mesoamerican civilization.

Chef Rick Bayless and Chef Ricardo Munoz will share their knowledge of the local cuisine and regional food historian and anthropologist, Raquel Torres will give a class on Afro-Caribbean dishes.

— While there, sit on the zocalo in the port and listen to the music and the incessant rhythm of daily life.

— Tap your spoon for a café con leche at the over 200 year old Gran Café de la Parroquia.

—Visit the villages of La Antigua and Villa Rica de la Vera Cruz, where Cortes first landed in 1519.

— See the site of the ancient city of El Tajin where the Totonac “flying dancers” perform their ceremonial aerial dance, hanging by their feet from a tall pole and slowly spinning to the ground.

—Stay in Coatepec, Mexico’s coffee capital.

—Travel to a vanilla orchid growing region and see vanilla being processed.

—Spend time at the magnificent Museo de Antropologica in Xalapa.

—Join me in eating my favorite mole in Xico, made, of all things, prunes…and of course, other

ingredients, as well.

 

For more information, Contact Marilyn Tausend or Carmen Barnard at Culinary Adventures Inc.

Email:  carmenculinary@gmail.com

Ricardo Muñoz Zurita on His New Dictionary and the Richness of Mexican Gastronomy

ricardo-munoz-zurita-interview

Photo: Mesamerica

In the following interview by Gabe Ulla of Eater.com, Ricardo talks about the dictionary project, his career, and the new generation of Mexican cooks.

Ricardo Muñoz Zurita has dedicated his life to Mexican food. He’s one of the country’s most well-regarded chefs, with several restaurants in Mexico City, but he hopes to be remembered for the eleven books he’s authored (so far) on topics ranging from chilis to salsas to colors in his country’s cooking. His greatest work is perhaps the Diccionario Enciclopédico de la Gastronomía Mexicana, a text that aims to codify every ingredient and technique in the vast gastronomic canon of Mexico. The most recent edition, edited by Larousse, represents the culmination of twenty-two years of work. Not to mention Muñoz Zurita took on the project in 80s, at a time when nothing like it existed, and Mexico’s culinary scene was in a sad state of affairs. The Larousse edition has just been released in Mexico and is currently being translated to English by the University of Texas at Austin.

To read the full interview go here.