Rick Bayless’s Extensive Library

www.culinaryadventuresinc.com; http://eater.com/archives/2014/03/28/rick-bayless-cookbook-shelf.php

Photo by Paula Forbes

Paula Forbes recently wrote this great article on Rick Bayless and his extensive library and how it is utilized, and how Rick creates an environment for ongoing education for himself and for his staff as they research foods for their menus. It is one of a series in The Cookbook Shelf, in which Eater talks to food professionals about their book collections.

I thought I had many, many Mexican cookbooks but obviously not as many as Rick. My books are erupting all over the window ledges and even the floors so I have donated many to the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) at San Antonio, Texas where they are teaching students from all over Mexico and Central America. It is a very special place with a very dedicated purpose.

And by the way, I am the one now editing Ricardo Munoz’s book that Rick mentioned. A mutual friend of ours, Carmen Barnard Baca, my former coordinator in Mexico, was one of the three translators, along with her brother, Roberto Barnard Baca and Cristina Potters, and now I am editing it and working with the University of Texas Press so that it will soon be available.

Roberto Santibanez shares advice for young chefs

Roberto was the guest speaker at this year’s graduating class at the Culinary Institute of America. In this interview, he gives great advice to young and experienced chefs.

Gourmand Cookbooks Finalists – Photographer Ignacio Urquiza

ignacio-urquiza

Congratulations to our friend, Nacho Urquiza for his outstanding photography for the cookbook, Cocina Mexicana, Patrimonio de la Humanidad, (Larousse de Mexico). Nacho was selected as one of the finalists in the Publisher’s Photography category for Gourmand’s COOKBOOKS FINALISTS 2013 which will be awarded this spring in Paris under the Pyramid of the Louvre Museum, in the Carrousel du Louvre, February 22-24, 2013. The book celebrates 200 years of Mexican cuisine.

Nacho is one of Mexico’s outstanding award winning photographers who provided photography for four Gourmand 20012 cookbook winners and in 2004 he won Gourmand’s best photography in a cookbook. You can see more of his work at Estudio Urquiza.

Mexican Cuisine’s African Roots

As a great deal of the historical information was cut from my new book due to lack of space, I was recently asked to include some of the background on Africa’s influence on the Mexican cuisine for the University of California Press blog and though I would share it and some of the photos taken by Nacho Urquiza of an African family on Oaxaca’s Costa Chica.

Antonieta Avila Salinas's Costa Chica Family

Antonieta Avila Salinas’s Costa Chica Family
Photo by Nacho Urquiza

African Influence on Mexican Cuisine
by Marilyn Tausend

I have been traveling throughout Mexico exploring the incredibly multi-cultured cuisine of its people for the last three decades. It was, though, only since researching the history of the African presence in Mexico for my newest cookbook, La Cocina Mexicana: Many Cultures, One Cuisine, did I realize that during the many years I’ve been coming to the tree-shrouded small village of La Antigua in Veracruz, that I had often stood right in front of Mexico’s first slave market, now the site of the local school. During the seventy-five years or so after Cortés moved his small contingent of Spanish troops and other followers south in 1525 from Quiahuiztlan to this safer harbor, thousands of Africans were put on the block to be auctioned off to the highest bidder. I since have visited many places in Veracruz where these slaves were relocated, some still retaining African names such as the nearby popular resort of Mocambo which means “sorrow” in the Congo dialect.[

Some African slaves also accompanied their Spanish owners during the exploration of New Spain with apparently the first African to set foot in these new lands being on Columbus’s second expedition. Twenty years later, the first black slaves in Mexico arrived with Hernan Cortés from the West Indies.

Read the rest of the article here.

Costa Chica Fishing by Nacho Urquiza

Costa Chica Fishing
Photo by Nacho Urquiza

Barbacoa de Pescado by Nacho Urquiza

Barbacoa de Pescado (recipe page 167-168)
Photo by Nacho Urquiza

Caldo de Tichnidas, Costa Chica

Antonieta making Caldo de Tichnidas
Photo by Nacho Urquiza

La Vida Gallery

La Vida Gallery

La Vida Gallery Front Window
San Antonio, Texas

Matt Weissler’s La Vida Gallery’s hugely popular First Friday book signing will be held tomorrow with Marilyn, Jon Bonnell, author of Texas Favorites,and Ward Albro, author of The Day of the Dead/ Dia De Los Muertos. Event runs from 7-9 p.m. Unfortunately, Susana Trilling had a little mishap and will not be able to make it, but she will be traveling to San Antonio the first weekend in December. Have a speedy recovery, Susana, and thank you Matt for all your help.

TriniGourmet’s Review

Here is an excerpt from TriniGourmet’s review of La Cocina Mexicana: Many Cultures, One Cuisine.

“Not only is it a loving record of the places and people she’s encountered in over 30 years of organizing culinary tours, she writes so evocatively that you quickly feel as though those experiences are your own!

Not simply a cookbook, La Cocina Mexicana, also strives to form a historical record of the cultures and landscapes of the many regions and peoples of Mexico. Infinitely more diverse than I was aware, this is not a cookbook for those who are looking for tacos, quesadillas, or a simple bean dip. It’s not that those are not available, however, Mexican cuisine is so much more. This is after all a country of 111 million people! Tausend opens our eyes, and palates, to the dishes of such indigenous peoples as the Zapotecs, Mayans and Otomí.

She also vividly describes and elaborates on the influence of not only the Spanish and French on Mexican cuisine, but also the Africans who were brought as slaves and whose place names and descendants still populate the Veracruz region, as well as the northern Pacific coast. In providing the idiom ‘you can find ah Trini anywhere’, the Roman Catholic priest for one of these remote Afro-Mexican communities was a Trinidadian priest by the name of Father Glyn Jemmott Nelson. You can view an interesting interview with him below.”

To read the entire review, go here.

Book Signings in October

San Antonio, Texas
October 5 – Culinary Institute of America, San Antonio Campus
Noon in the breezeway of the CIA’s campus specializing in Latin Cuisine
Historic Pearl Brewery complex, 312 Pearl Parkway. Telephone: 210-554-6400

October 5 — 7-9 p.m. La Vida Gallery
716 S. Alamo St. Telephone 210 224-3232

Austin, Texas
October 6 – 3:30-5:30 p.m. Restaurante El Naranjo with Chef Iliana de la Vega at 85 Rainey Street, Austin.
Telephone: 512 474 2776

October 7 – Noon-2 p.m. Fonda San Miguel, 2330 W. North Loop. Telephone: 512 459 4121

Gig Harbor, WA
October 21 – 2-4 p.m. Tides Tavern with Chef Ernie Davis, 2925 Harborview Dr., Gig Harbor, 
Telephone: 253 858 3982

Seattle, WA
October 24 – 5-7 p.m., Flying Fish with Chef Christina Keff, 300 Westlake Ave. N., Seattle.
Telephone: 206 728 8595