We’re Ready to Go! *Mexico City-Puebla-Tlaxcala* March 10-18, 2019

We are very happy to announce our March Culinary Adventure to the central high plateau of Mexico– Puebla and Tlaxcala!

Starting off and ending in Mexico City, our very own Chef Ricardo Muñoz Zurita will launch us into this culinary world and recap at the end of our adventures. We will explore the colonial beauty of Puebla– which is Ana Elena Martínez‘s hometown, the small but mighty and historically weighty Tlaxcala– with Chef Irad Santacruz, Cooks Nicolás Hernández Muñoz and Dalia Rodríguez Hernández, delving into the distinctive, extraordinary foods that each place adds to Mexico’s soul satisfying gastronomy.

Plan to arrive at least a day early to join our group from the very first gathering on Sunday, March 10th, 2019 at 6pm.

The fee for this culinary adventure is $3750 double occupancy, $4000 single occupancy. As is custom these past 33 years, our fee includes daily classes and demos, 8 nights hotel, at least two meals a day and all fees associated with the trip, excluding airfare. All classes include well-served tastings or meals– you do not go hungry on our trips!

A $400 deposit is required to reserve a spot on our trip with the balance due January 25th, 2019.

Ricardo, Ana Elena and I are committed to sharing our respective knowledge, love and passion of our country’s culinary riches, our people, and regional cultures. After 33 years, we still get all revved up planning a new adventure!

Email Carmen now to sign up at: office@culinaryadventuresinc.com

¡Hasta pronto!

Looking Back on our Chef’s Trip to Mexico City…

“No es de donde es el ingrediente originario, sino lo que el ingrediente representa para una cultura” .      “It’s not the origin of an ingredient that’s important, but what that ingredient represents for a culture.”                 –Chef Ricardo Muñoz Zurita

These words by Ricardo caught my attention before leaving to our Mexico City Chef’s Trip in January.   They got me even more excited for the trip; the reunion with both Ricardo Muñoz and Ana Elena Martínez, our shared sense of purpose, the smells, sounds, colors of people, of foods, structures, skies–everything that makes your land of birth sing to you, always calling you home. These words especially got me looking forward to seeing our guests fall for Mexico and, “getting” the importance of what an ingredient can, indeed, represent for a culture.

And fall they did. Some- once again, others- for the first time, others still- through our viewpoint. A marvelous combination of food people, from different backgrounds and cultures and culinary experiences. They soaked up the subtle difference of a cooked- as opposed to an uncooked- tomatillo in a “raw” salsa, our delicious mestizo food world and it’s class differences- visible in our cuisines, a joyful miscegenation of ingredients and techniques; the depths that corn reaches back into our culture, the soul food of Tlaxcala, a warm northerner’s rock and roll edgy cooking, the happily “surreal” idiosyncrasies of our country and their influence on a chef and perception of  color, a  chef’s conscientious quest to go back- and bring forward- old styles a la slow foods….Chefs Ricardo Muñoz, Josefina Santacruz, Irad Santacruz, Cooks Nicolas Hernández and Dalia Rodríguez, Chefs Antonio de Livier, Martha Ortíz and Gerardo Vázquez Lugo outdid themselves and REALLY showcased those ingredients and what they represent to our multi cultures of Mexico. I can’t thank them enough.

We will be posting photos of the trip now and then between sending out a cry for Oaxaca, which we shall visit in September at the end of the abundant harvests of rainy season. More to come on that fabulous trip!

I had Ricardo’s words in my mind on the way to Mexico City.  But they came back to me while reflecting on Marilyn Tausend’s departure and what she means to me, her unplanned influence on so many people over 30 years, her stubbornness for Mexico, for cooking, writing, learning and, connecting people.  Her lost soul as a child, found again perhaps in Mexico, makes me  realize that it is not her origin that is important, but what she means and represents to the Mexican culture and the world she created.

Mil gracias, Marilyn, q.e.p.d.

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